THE UILLEANN PIPES

The uilleann pipes are a highly developed and sophisticated member of the bagpipe family. The chanter, which plays the lead melody, is similar to the early 18th century oboe in terms of its melodic range and chromatic capability. The three drones form a pedal bass against the lead melody on the chanter and the three regulators provide a third musical line that adds harmony and rhythm to the instrument.

THE WOODEN FLUTE

The wooden eight-keyed flute, sometimes referred to as the concert flute, was actually the form of flute used in classical orchestras up until the middle of the 19th century at which point the metal Boehm system flute became more popular. Many of the classic makers of this type of flute were located in England and vintage instruments were manufactured by Nicholson, Prowse, Rudall and Rose, etc. The instrument has six open holes augmented by eight block mounted keys for accidentals.

THE TINWHISTLE OR PENNYWHISTLE

Tinwhistles or pennywhistles are members of the flageolet family of woodwind instruments. The very earliest whistles were made from bone. In more recent times, metal, plastics and other synthetics are used to make these instruments. Regardless of the material used in construction, a whistle is basically a fipple mouthpiece attached to a cylindrical tube that has six fingerholes.
 

THE LOW WHISTLE

Low whistles are longer tinwhistles that play at lower pitches. Typically, a whistle is considered a low whistle when the lowest note on the whistle is G (above middle C) or lower.


THE SCOTTISH SMALLPIPES

The Scottish Smallpipes were traditionally a bagpipe common to the Border area of Scotland and England. The smallpipes have a cylindrical, narrow bore chanter that plays an octave lower than conical bore chanters of the same length. They are a bellows blown instument with a mellow, sweet tone. 


THE SCOTTISH HIGHLAND PIPES

The best known member of the bagpipe world, the highland pipes have three drones that play a pedal bass note against the lead melody on the chanter. The highland pipe chanter has a nine note diatonic range although some chromatics are available with cross or fork fingerings.